1. thesharkspirit asked: I'm not arguing for or against global warming, but how can we accurately predict global warming over millions of years when the weatherman can barely predict what will happen tomorrow? There are photos of ice increasing in the Arctic from the start of November 2013 and yet people say the earth is heating up. I'm sort of conflicted on the issue and would like to know your opinion on it.

    jtotheizzoe:

    My friend, what you need to realize is that my opinion doesn’t matter. Nor does your opinion, or anyone else’s opinion. This isn’t about opinions.

    This is about science. We can predict with confidence how the climate will change in the next several years because scientists have spent decades studying the climate of the past, from eons-old atmosphere trapped in ancient ice cores to fossilized coral growth rings in a changing ocean to advanced computer modeling that can take into account everything from the angle of the dangle of the sun to the cooling effect of volcanos and dino-killing meteorites.

    We have DATA. Data that strongly—and strongly here really doesn’t do justice to how sure we are—suggests that human beings are accelerating climate change to ludicrous speed*.

    Like Neil deGrasse Tyson says: “Science is true whether or not you believe in it.” Accepting that is a wonderful thing. The world is full of lies, and science can keep you from getting hustled.

    Your weatherman is wrong because weather doesn’t equal climate. Weather is the lucky guy who comes home from Vegas with a stack of cash. Climate is the casino, and given enough time, no matter how many suckers may hit the jackpot, the house always wins.

    *Spaceballs reference, aw yiss

     

  2. "

    Nobody gets to be you, except you. Nobody has your point of view, except you. Nobody gets to bring to the worlds the things taht you get to bring to the world – uniquely get to bring to the world – except you.

    So saying there are enough writers out there, enough directors out there, enough people with a point of view – well, yeah, there are – but none of them are you, none of this them is going to make the art that you’re going to make, none of them will change people and change the world in the way that you could change it.

    So if you believe somebody who says, ‘No, no, we’ve got enough of those,’ then all it means is you’re giving up your chance to change the world the way only you can change it.

    "
    — 

    When a young woman cites being told she shouldn’t pursue being an artist because there are too many artists in the world already, Neil Gaiman offers some words of wisdom. Complement with his even wiser advice to young people in the arts.

    A fine addition to our ongoing archive of sage, timeless advice

    (via explore-blog)

    (Source: , via explore-blog)

     
  3. explore-blog:

    One day of transit in New York City, visualized in a mesmerizing animation.

    ( Transportation Nation)

    (Source: , via explore-blog)

     
     
  4. explore-blog:

    3D artist and motion designer JR Schmidt reconstructs New York City in LEGO using an assortment of maps and satellite imagery to set the elevation and color of the blocks. Best thing since Christoph Niemann’s I LEGO NY.

    ( Coudal)

    (Source: , via explore-blog)

     
  5. explore-blog:

    family tree diagram of the entire Greek mythology

    ( Chartporn)

    (Source: , via explore-blog)